American Online Phonebook

Tag: From

Datafold raises seed from NEA to keep improving the lives of data engineers

November 19, 2020 No Comments

Data engineering is one of these new disciplines that has gone from buzzword to mission critical in just a few years. Data engineers design and build all the connections between sources of raw data (your payments information or ad-tracking data or what have you) and the ultimate analytics dashboards used by business executives and data scientists to make decisions. As data has exploded, so has their challenge of doing this key work, which is why a new set of tools has arrived to make data engineering easier, faster and better than ever.

One of those tools is Datafold, a YC-backed startup I covered just a few weeks ago as it was preparing for its end-of-summer Demo Day presentation.

Well, that Demo Day presentation and the company’s trajectory clearly caught the eyes of investors, since the startup locked in $ 2.1 million in seed funding from NEA, the company announced this morning.

As I wrote back in August:

With Datafold, changes made by data engineers in their extractions and transformations can be compared for unintentional changes. For instance, maybe a function that formerly returned an integer now returns a text string, an accidental mistake introduced by the engineer. Rather than wait until BI tools flop and a bunch of alerts come in from managers, Datafold will indicate that there is likely some sort of problem, and identify what happened.

Definitely read our profile if you want to learn more about the product and origin story.

Not a whole heck of a lot has changed over the past few weeks (some new features, some new customers), but with more money in its billfold, Datafold is going to keep on growing, hiring and taking on the world of data engineering.


Enterprise – TechCrunch


Taking a PPC holiday: how to take a break from your ads without disaster

November 17, 2020 No Comments

One specialist shares her top 5 tips for taking a PPC holiday without disaster striking.

Read more at PPCHero.com
PPC Hero


What we’ve learned about working from home 7 months into the pandemic

November 9, 2020 No Comments

When large parts of the world were shutting down in March, we really didn’t know how we would move massive numbers of employees used to working in the office to work from home.

In early March, I wrote a piece on how to prepare for such an eventuality, speaking to several experts who had a background in the software and other tooling that would be involved. But the shift involved so much more than the mechanics of working at home. We were making this transition during a pandemic that was forcing us to deal with a much broader set of issues in our lives.

Yet here we are seven months later, and surely we must have learned some lessons along the way about working from home effectively, but what do these lessons look like and how can we make the most of this working approach for however long this pandemic lasts?

I spoke to Karen Mangia, vice president of customer and market insights at Salesforce and author of the book, Working from Home, Making the New Normal Work for You, to get her perspective on what working from home looks like as we enter our eighth month and what we’ve learned along the way.

Staying productive

As employees moved home in March, managers had to wonder how productive employees would be without being in the office. While many companies had flexible approaches to work, this usually involved some small percentage of employees working from home, not the entire workforce, and that presented challenges to management used to judging employee performance based for the most part on being in the building during the work day.

One of the things that we looked at in March was putting the correct tools in place to enable communication even when we weren’t together. Mangia says that those tools can help close what she calls the trust gap.

“Leaders want to know that their employees are working on what’s expected and delivering outcomes. Employees want to make sure their managers know how hard they’re working and that they’re getting things done. And the technology and tools I think help us solve for that trust gap in the middle,” she explained.

She believes the biggest thing that individuals can do at the moment is to simply reassess and look for small ways to improve your work life because we are probably not going to be returning to the office anytime soon. “I think what we’re discovering is the things that we can put in place to improve the quality of our own experiences as employees, as learners and as leaders can be very simple adjustments. This does not have to be a five year, five phase, $ 5 million roadmap kind of a situation. Simple adjustments matter,” she said, adding that could be measures as basic as purchasing a comfortable chair because the one you’ve been using at the dining room table is hurting your back.


Enterprise – TechCrunch


Digital Marketing in a VUCA World: Is it Time to Emerge from Plato’s Cave?

October 31, 2020 No Comments

Google, Facebook, Amazon, etc. are giving digital marketers what Socrates would call a “superficial truth”. The data sets are incomplete.

Read more at PPCHero.com
PPC Hero


How to immediately profit from your next piece of content

October 30, 2020 No Comments

30-second summary:

  • Most content marketers focus on creating blog posts and writing guest posts to improve SEO rankings. This approach overlooks the value of insightful content as a sales resource, especially for B2B firms.
  • What type of content works best for sales prospecting. Examples of content and an overview of how to create your outreach list.
  • An overview of two campaigns where blog content was used to generate leads for an SEO agency. Included in the overview are email templates and campaign outcomes.
  • How to review and optimize your content marketing outreach campaigns to generate more leads for your business.

Significant business resources are invested in creating content that is never engaged with, writing guest posts that are never read, and sharing content that is never seen. It’s a reality that most of us choose to ignore because we are fixated on inbound marketing.

While inbound marketing is effective, it’s not without problems:

  1. Most of the visitors who engage with your content will never return. It’s generally agreed that somewhere in the region of 2%-6% of first-time visitors return to a website.
  2. You have little control over who visits, and most visitors do not fit the profile of your customer persona (you’ll be doing very well if you convert even 0.3% of site visitors into customers).
  3. There are only so many spaces on the front page of Google. Truthfully, most of us will be fighting and failing to achieve our desired SERP rankings.

Outbound marketing sidesteps two of those three issues.

When you create a list of companies that fit your target demographic and then send emails to the relevant people in that company, you gain a degree of control over who consumes your content. Where you sit in the search rankings will not impact the outcome of your campaign.

While most sales teams use outbound marketing, few companies coordinate their content marketing efforts with outbound sales initiatives.

I believe that this is an oversight. I’ve secured several new customers for my agency in the last three months by coordinating my sales and content marketing efforts.

This guide will share an approach that I believe can help all businesses, but especially small to medium-sized businesses, that operate in the B2B space acquire new customers. It’s a strategy that relies upon creating a small amount of really great content, then actively promoting that content to the right people. Let’s dive in.

1. Consider the goals of your customer

Ideally, your outbound marketing strategy should neatly fit into your long term content marketing goals. For me, an optimal content campaign that aligns with sales should look something like this.

At the start of the campaign, you need to identify relevant keywords to target.

The keywords you pick should align with your ideal customer’s pain points and the solution that you offer either through your product or service. For example, at my company, we help businesses in the SaaS niche secure guest posts on relevant sites. I decided that the initial outreach campaign would be based around my guide on how to guest post.

You can see how the topic aligns with the solution.

If you’re going to run an outreach campaign that utilizes content from your site, you must use informative content that offers value. After all, the article will be the first impression that you leave with a potential customer interacting with your business.

You can create multiple pieces of content around your product or service offering. However, I recommend you start with one piece of cornerstone content.

2. Create a customer outreach list

There is a good chance that you already have a strategy in place to promote new content. Often, that involves creating a list of sites that have linked to a competing piece of content. You then find the contact details of the author and send them a message asking for a link.

A sales outreach campaign based around a piece of content is just as straightforward. However, the goal and who you target is different.

I’ll assume you have a customer persona. You know what type of companies buy your products or services. You need to create a list of suitable companies. You can use resources like Google My Business, the Inc 5,000, and other business roundups to quickly create a list of suitable companies to contact. 

Once you’ve created your shortlist, you need to find the details of the person in charge of purchasing decisions at each company. For an SEO agency, that person typically has a job title like ‘Chief Marketing Officer (CMO)’.

I generally use a combination of LinkedIn and an email finder to get their contact details. Hunter and Voila Norbert both offer 50 free searches, which is enough for an initial campaign.

Pull all of that information you collect into a Google Sheet.

3. Run your outreach campaign

There are numerous types of sales outreach campaigns you can run that incorporate blog content. For example, I collected the details of everyone who left a comment on the Backlinko blog. I removed individuals and companies that didn’t fit my customer persona and sent them all an email.

Below is a screenshot of the email template I used alongside one of the responses.

Piece of content - Profit from it by email outreach - Example 1

You can see this is a soft sell. The only reference to the service I offer is my email signature that links to a sales page. The primary resource in the email was this blog post.

I wanted to start a conversation with prospective customers not generate an instant sale.

This particular outreach campaign, which was sent to around 200 people, generated two leads. In addition, I was asked to appear on a podcast and was offered a couple of guest post opportunities.

You can be more direct. Here is an example from another campaign.

Piece of content - Profit from it by email outreach

We leveraged the credibility of Sumo for this sales campaign. The company has more brand recognition than Launch Space, a site that few people would recognize.

The primary resource used for the Sumo sales campaign was this article. The guest post fits the criteria of a cornerstone piece of content. It’s actionable, insightful, and relevant to the needs of prospective customers.

You might have noticed that I adapted my email signature for the campaign. We generated two leads from our first 100 emails.

4. Review the results

If this is your first campaign, I recommend you send outreach emails to between 100-200 companies. Send your emails, then a week or two later, review the results.

The first campaign we ran had a 1% conversion rate. I sent 100 emails and got one customer.

The math was simple.

I didn’t use any marketing tools for the campaign. You might choose to start the same way.

To improve the results of any marketing campaign, you need to track relevant metrics. There are plenty of affordable email tracking tools that provide insights like email opens, link clicks, and other statistics.

Good email tracking tools will allow you to split test your copy. You’ll also gather information on when people open your email and who opened your message multiple times but didn’t respond. You can use this data to improve your campaign results, for example, by scheduling your emails for the optimal time or day of the week or deciding on who to send multiple emails to.

Wrapping up

In this guide, I outlined how you can include blog posts and guest posts in your cold outreach to generate leads for your business. It’s a strategy that I’ve used to consistently land fresh clients, which has, in turn, helped me grow my business.

If you’re a B2B company selling a product or service with a high-profit margin, outbound marketing will normally provide you with a positive Return On Investment (ROI). It’s logical to utilize blog content as a sales resource, especially if you presume that the content will eventually generate leads through inbound marketing. Most companies don’t do this; I hope this article has provided you with the impetus to try.

Nico Prins is an online marketer and the founder of Launch Space. He helps companies develop their digital marketing strategies. He’s worked with everyone from Fortune 500 companies to startups helping them develop content marketing strategies that align with their business goals. Follow him on Twitter @nhdprins.

The post How to immediately profit from your next piece of content appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

Search Engine Watch


PageRank sculpting: How to get more from your links

October 26, 2020 No Comments

30-second summary:

  • SEO strategists focused on link building often forget that it’s much easier to optimize their existing link equity than it is to build more.
  • Large enterprise and ecommerce websites with thousands of landing pages often spread PageRank too thin, sending link equity to pages that are unlikely to ever rank.
  • SEO strategists can achieve dramatic ranking improvements by changing the internal linking profile of their websites to concentrate more PageRank on their highest-value landing pages.
  • An iterative approach to internal link edits with a crawler, A/B testing, and site rollbacks allows webmasters to make adjustments until they get their PageRank distribution right.

Over the past decade, some SEOs have loudly proclaimed that the art of PageRank sculpting is dead. As is often true when armchair technologists voice their opinions with clickbait headlines, they got it dead wrong. In fact, the larger the site and the more PageRank it has, the more effective PageRank sculpting can be.

PageRank-driven link algorithms are Google’s original authority metrics. They are still the fundamental basis for how authority is evaluated on a per-page and per-domain basis. PageRank even underlies the PA/DA metrics from Moz and UR/DR from Ahrefs. Google uses its PageRank algorithms to separate the signal from the noise in its massive 30 trillion page index and provide high-quality search results. 

Call me a traditionalist, but one of the reasons I love experimenting with PageRank is because it is an onsite strategy that I have 100% control over. Earning new links is great, but it’s time-consuming work. Maximizing the value of my existing links is much easier than building new ones. For websites with large existing backlink profiles, it’s often more immediately impactful. 

Not trying to use PageRank to your advantage is a major missed opportunity, particularly for enterprise-level or e-commerce sites with hundreds to thousands of landing pages. This post will break down three powerful PageRank strategies that I use with my clients to improve their rankings. But first — some history.

How PageRank sculpting died and why it should come back

Once upon a time, Google offered full transparency about their PageRank calculations for any page on the internet directly from their database. SEOs knew which pages had more PageRank and did everything they could to capitalize on it. 

PageRank toolbar

One of the ways SEOs used to do PageRank sculpting was by using nofollow tags to direct more link juice to specific pages. Google responded by making it so that all links on a page transfer the same amount of equity, regardless of nofollows. Also, Google decided to deprecate and later fully shutter their PageRank API endpoints. 

Although we no longer have a window into PageRank metrics, it is still being distributed across our sites, so thinking about where we are sending it is really important. I regularly see large websites with multiple landing pages that target too many competitive keywords. Ninety-five percent of their pages get no traffic, but their PageRank is being stretched across all of them. 

Some ecommerce sites have a product page for every SKU in their catalog, resulting in too much PageRank being sent to inventory that’s low-value, out-of-stock, or unlikely to rank on Google. Those ecommerce sites that dynamically create new pages from a template for every city or state often only rank for keywords with low search volume. Those kinds of pages usually don’t have enough unique content for Google to see them as valuable, so sending link equity there is a complete waste of precious PageRank.

New ecommerce sites with thousands of product SKUs right off-the-bat never work because they’ve spread their site authority across too many pages and don’t have enough PageRank for the pages that matter. When you look at successful large sites like Amazon (which has over 300 million landing pages), they put their most important product segments into the navigation menu, so they can direct their domain’s PageRank where they want it for SEO purposes. 

So how do you shift your page PageRank in a way that actually has an impact? You do it through internal links. Internal links spread around your link equity from one page of your site to another. Here are some of the internal linking strategies that I’ve used to shift PageRank and produce dramatic results for large websites.

#1: Reclaim lost PageRank by redirecting broken internal pages

A page that is 404-ing cannot rank in search results and doesn’t pass PageRank to other pages. One of the first ways you can get more out of your links is by redirecting those broken internal links to your highest-value landing pages. 

As we build our websites over time, site structure changes, and URL permalinks can change too. This is especially true for older websites with a lot of history, as well as larger websites with lots of web pages. The links that point to your site are static, so it’s very common for older backlinks to point to broken pages. It’s also common that old internal links in blog posts or other content regions of our site point to pages that no longer exist. Google’s crawlers see all of this, and it reflects the poorly on-site quality.

To reclaim that PageRank, you just need to create redirects from the 404ing page to the appropriate landing page. Here are a few strategies for finding your broken backlinks and 404ing pages:

  1. Google Search Console: Check your 404 logs to see a list of broken links and pages
  2. Audit your incoming backlinks: Use a backlink analysis tool to test the pages where the incoming links are going to make sure they are resolving. If you know how to code, you can build a simple Python script to do this for you.
  3. Analyze server logfiles: If you’re tech-savvy, check your apache or Nginx log files to find 404ing pages, especially those crawled by Googlebot.

It’s a good idea to do this regularly, especially for dynamic sites with a lot of content. I like to run my crawler across our sites every month to make sure all of the internal links are pointing to valid landing pages without any 301 redirects or 404ing broken pages. This is a signal to Google that there’s a webmaster looking after the site and the site is high-quality.

It’s important to think about whether the content of your redirected pages is topically relevant to the old page. Universally redirecting 404s back to your homepage is lazy and not a great idea. Once you identify the broken links pointing to your site, find landing pages that would make sense to redirect them to. 

Also, keep in mind that the PageRank algorithm has a “damping factor”. Each time PageRank transfers from page to page, it incurs a 15% loss, including across redirects. For internal links, there’s no reason to be losing 15% of your internal PageRank. For external links, a 301 redirect lets you capture 85% of the link equity, which is much better than getting 0% with a 404. 

#2: Concentrate the PageRank of your domain onto the pages that really matter

Google uses the internal linking structure of your website to calculate the amount of PageRank on each page. Most sites have the bulk of their PageRank on their home page, which then passes link juice through to the rest of the site. Pages that are closer to the homepage, like those linked to in a navigation menu and footer, or pages that are internally linked to frequently, will always have more PageRank. 

PageRank-animation-2

Image source: Linkgraph.io

To identify which pages on your site you should remove or push deeper, check Google Analytics to see which of your landing pages aren’t getting organic traffic. It helps to build a list of the pages you want to take PageRank away from, as well as the highest opportunity landing pages on your site that you want to push more PageRank towards. Here are a few strategies for how to concentrate PageRank where you want it to go.

  1. Use your header and footer: They serve as a kind of buoy for PageRank across your domain, so linking the most important pages on your site in them concentrates your PageRank onto those important pages.
  2. Remove the worst performing pages: To make your internal linking more effective, don’t have pages in the header and footer that don’t get traffic or rank well. Remove links to them from the home page, nest them deeper into your site, merge pages, or remove them altogether.
  3. Create category pages: Category pages are a great way to build silos of PageRank that you can concentrate on select pages. Prioritize the items on these pages, and link to pages that matter the most near the top of the page.
  4. Use a site:search on Google: The order in which your pages appear will help you understand which pages that search engines see as the most important by PageRank.
  5. Use Blog Content: Blog content allows you to link to your high-value landing pages in a way that is contextually relevant. This helps reinforce topical relevance, depth, and authority for your most important pages.

#3: A/B test your PageRank sculpting

For those who want to attempt some heavy PageRank shifting, it’s important to take an iterative approach to your internal link edits. It helps to use a version control system (like Git) or site snapshots that you can deploy and crawl in a staging environment. As I make my edits, I recrawl my site in the staging environment each time to see how much more PageRank I’m getting on the pages that matter.

Once I’m ready, I’ll deploy the new version live and then monitor my keyword rankings for the affected pages over the course of a week or two. If you’ve picked the right pages to prune and promote, you should see a nice lift in keyword rankings where it matters. If not, you can easily rollback. 

PageRank sculpting works best when used on a site with high-quality landing pages with good UI/UX and strong core web vitals. As with all SEO strategies, they work best when combined. If your primary pages are not high quality or have poor UI/UX, no amount of PageRank shifting is going to get them onto page one. 

Overall, larger websites run a greater risk of spreading link equity too thin simply due to their size. But for those that have quality pages, PageRank sculpting is an ideal strategy for helping Google recognize the pages that matter most.

What are your thoughts on PageRank sculpting? Have you ever tried your hand at it? Feel free to share your thoughts and queries in the comments section.

Manick Bhan is the founder and CTO of LinkGraph, an award-winning digital marketing and SEO agency that provides SEO, paid media, and content marketing services. He is also the founder and CEO of SearchAtlas, a software suite of free SEO tools. You can find Manick on Twitter @madmanick.

The post PageRank sculpting: How to get more from your links appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

Search Engine Watch


Content marketing metrics for B2B companies: From ToFu to BoFu

September 8, 2020 No Comments

30-second summary:

  • Your content marketing may sound like a success story, until your CEO asks, “Is all this effort and spending really paying off?”
  • You’re doing a great job if you’re one of the 39 % of marketers who are successfully tracking the ROI of their content marketing, if not, there’s a long way to go.
  • Evaldas Mockus, Director of SEO at Omnisend helps you pick content marketing metrics that matter for your business.
  • More on Top of the Funnel (ToFu), Middle of the Funnel (MoFu), and Bottom of the Funnel (BoFu) content, and their respective goals.

You’re publishing content, traffic is picking up, your posts look amazing, and subscribers are opening your emails. It sounds like a content marketing team success story – until your CEO asks:

Is all this effort and spending really paying off?

You’re doing a great job if you’re one of the 39 % of marketers who are successfully tracking the ROI of their content marketing – everyone should be doing this!

But there’s no point in tracking data if you’re unable to access a document with content result numbers that are clear and easily understandable. I’m here to help you pick the metrics that matter for your business.

Top of the Funnel (ToFu), Middle of the Funnel (MoFu), and Bottom of the Funnel (BoFu) content have different goals respectively, which means you need to differentiate your existing and new content for each funnel stage and find the right metrics for them.

To build a detailed metrics dashboard, you need access to Google Analytics (GA), Google Search Console (GSC), and Facebook Pixel.

ToFu key content marketing metrics

The main goals for ToFu content:

  • Awareness – you need to reach new audiences and attract a steady stream of new visitors to grow your business
  • Branding initiatives – spreading your company name and mission with easily recognizable branding helps you to build authority in your niche.

Depending on your business and historical data you can also have other goals.

Even after reaching these goals, you still need to focus on your buyer persona. You’ll be lying to yourself and your stakeholders if you’re selling software for marketing agency management, but your ToFu content is focused only on traffic growth which is not related to your business.

I can bet that it would be almost impossible to convert those visitors into paying customers.

To understand how you’re performing with your content marketing activities on ToFu, track these metrics:

  • New visits – the formula is simple – more marketing activities equals more traffic. GA
  • Percentage of new visitors – try to keep a good balance here. The average percentage of new visitors on site is 68%, if your number is extremely high or low, you need to identify the reasons why. GA
  • New direct visitors – this number shows that people know your brand and are actively looking for you. This is often your most profitable ‘organic’ traffic source. GA
  • Branded Search – how many people come via a branded search. This metric shows the success of all your marketing efforts. Sometimes it’s not the best product that wins but the best-known one that wins. GSC
  • Pixeled audience – build your audience for remarketing purposes. Facebook pixel

These five metrics alone can easily show if you’re going in the right direction, especially when you compare historical data and map it to your activities.

Additional drill-down metrics like content bounce rate, pages/visits, and average session length can help you to understand the quality of your blog content and user behavior. But there is no need to focus on these on a weekly basis.

MoFu key content marketing metrics

The biggest challenge in the middle of the funnel is to convert “problem aware” prospects into leads. At this stage, you’re mainly focusing on two goals: driving visitors back to your site and converting visitors into leads.

You need to deliver leads for your nurturing campaigns. Brands that are the most effective at lead nurturing generate 50% more sales at a 33% lower cost, according to Forrester Research.

To understand if you’re doing a great job on MoFu, follow these metrics:

  • Visitor recency – how frequently do visitors come back to your site? If visitors are coming back pretty often, this is a good sign that your content quality is top-notch and satisfies their particular needs. If your visitor recency number is too low, then you need to focus on two different aspects – 1. Improving your content quality and 2. Building links to your website so you get a better ranking in SERP. GA
  • Returning direct visitors – these are returning visitors who are actively looking for you again. Finding ways to get new visitors to keep coming back to your site with fresh, engaging, and relevant content will boost interest and keep people coming back for more. GA
  • Leads generated: how many leads are you generating? This part can be a little more complicated. First, you need to describe exactly how you’re acquiring leads, and secondly, you’ll need to set up Goal tracking in GA.

Remember that you know your business better than anyone else. If you wish to delve deeper, you can always add other metrics like: growth of retargeting lists, blog banners click percentage or even the number of social shares.

BoFu key content marketing metrics

Only a few buyers will move directly to purchase simply from reading an amazing article. B2B brands should track the customer journey throughout the whole funnel, from the very first website visit to conversions such as offer registrations.

Of course, the main goal at BoFu is to convert those leads you’ve captured earlier into loyal customers.

The main metrics to track here include:

  • Conversions – this is the primary number out of all your metrics.
  • How many visitors leave your offer/demo page – You need to be constantly working on offer/demo page improvements. If you can see that a high percentage of visitors are leaving these pages without taking any action, there’s a good chance that by optimizing these pages, you can give your conversion rate a solid boost.
  • Content that is generating customers – This is not a metric, but understanding what types of content is responsible for getting customers will help you to prioritize your upcoming content topics. Also, your PPC team can help to bring more traffic for these pages immediately.

It is time to build your report

Big data and a ton of different metrics can be intimidating, and often a waste of your precious time. As we’ve seen, with just three-four key metrics on each stage of the funnel, you can accurately gauge the direction of your content marketing efforts.

The selected metrics are just the beginning. For a true analysis, you need to understand what these numbers mean and which actions influence improvements throughout the funnel.

When you have accumulated a couple of months’ worth of data, you will start to see patterns and it will become easier to plan your new activities. Now, you can begin to understand exactly where to optimize, and when.

Imagine – that after working hard for two months, you see a big increase in your ToFu metrics. Traffic is growing, your brand searches volume is skyrocketing, but your conversions rate is constantly going down. Only by getting all of your data in place will you be able to see the patterns clearly, and find a solution to bring only relevant traffic that converts.

Evaldas Mockus is Director of SEO at Omnisend.

The post Content marketing metrics for B2B companies: From ToFu to BoFu appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

Search Engine Watch


How do I unsubscribe from Netflix?

September 5, 2020 No Comments

 compte netflix gratuit Have you seen every possible and unimaginable series on Netflix? Are you just disappointed and think it’s time to unsubscribe?

Whatever your type of subscription to the Netflix platform, know that it is easy to delete your account.

In this tutorial, we explain how to cancel your Netflix subscription, whether you still have the welcome offer or not.

Unsubscribe from Netflix

Netflix is ​​an online video platform that offers three types of subscriptions ranging from € 7.99 to € 15.99.

If for any reason you wish to end your subscription then follow these video streaming service unsubscribe steps.

  1. Sign into your account.
  2. Click on your profile at the top right and select Account .
  3. In the Subscription and Billing section , click on the Cancel subscription option .
  4. On the page that opens, all you have to do is click on Complete the cancellation .
  5. Your cancellation is now registered and will take effect on the last day of the month.Please note that you can reactivate your account at any time. The latter will be permanently closed 10 months after deactivation.If you consider this delay too long, then Netflix advises you to send an email to   privacy@netflix.com , from the email address given during your registration.Also, we recommend that you delete your bank details, in order to avoid any use of your account without your consent. You can also request it in your cancellation email.Remove a profile from your Netflix accountIf you only want to delete one or more profiles associated with your account, then follow the steps below.

    Log in to Netflix.

    Click on your profile and select Account .

    In the My Profile section , click the Manage Profiles option on the right.

    Choose the profile, then click Remove. 

For more information on boosting and saving your personal data, then go to the help center.

To access it, click Account , then click Help Center from the drop-down list. Finally, in the search bar, type Information deletion and information retention policy .

Cheap Phones


Box benefits from digital transformation as it raises its growth forecast

August 31, 2020 No Comments

Box has always been a bit of an enigma for Wall Street, and perhaps for enterprise software in general. Unlike vendors who shifted to the cloud tools like HR, CRM or ERP, Box has been building a way to manage content in the cloud. It’s been a little harder to understand than these other enterprise software stalwarts, but slowly but surely Box has shifted into a more efficient, and dare we say, profitable public company.

Yesterday the company filed its Q2 2021 earnings report and it was solid. In fact, the company reported revenue of $ 192.3 million. That’s an increase of 11% year over year and it beat analyst’s expectations of $ 189.6 million, according to the company. Meanwhile the guidance looked good too, moving from a range of $ 760 to $ 768 million for the year to a range of $ 767 to $ 770 million.

All of this points to a company that is finding its footing. Let’s not forget, Starboard Value bought a 7.5% stake in the company a year ago, yet the activist investor has mostly stayed quiet and Box seems to be rewarding its patience as the pandemic acts as a forcing function to move customers to the cloud faster — and that seems to be working in Box’s favor.

Let’s get profitable

Box CEO Aaron Levie has not been shy about talking about how the pandemic has pushed companies to move to the cloud much more quickly than they probably would have. He said as a digital company, he was able to move his employees to work from home and remain efficient because of tools like Slack, Zoom, Okta and, yes, Box were in place to help them do that.

All of that helped keep the business going, and even thriving, through the extremely difficult times the pandemic has wrought. “We’re fortunate about how we’ve been able to execute in this environment. It helps that we’re 100% SaaS, and we’ve got a great digital engine to perform the business,” he said.

He added, “And at the same time, as we’ve talked about, we’ve been driving greater profitability. So the efficiency of the businesses has also improved dramatically, and the result was that overall we had a very strong quarter with better growth than expected and better profitability than expected. As a result, we were able to raise our targets on both revenue growth and profitability for the rest of the year,” Levie told TechCrunch.

Let’s get digital

Box is seeing existing customers and new customers alike moving more rapidly to the cloud, and that’s working in its favor. Levie believes that companies are in the process of reassessing their short and longer term digital strategy right now, and looking at what workloads they’ll be moving to the cloud, whether that’s cloud infrastructure, security in the cloud or content.

“Really customers are going to be trying to find a way to be able to shift their most important data and their most important content to the cloud, and that’s what we’re seeing play out within our customer base,” Levie said.

He added, “It’s not really a question anymore if you’re going to go to the cloud, it’s which cloud are you going to go to. And we’ve obviously been very focused on trying to build that leading platform for companies that want to be able to move their data to a cloud environment and be able to manage it securely, drive workflows on it, integrate it across our applications and that’s what we’re seeing,” he said.

That translated into a 60% increase quarter over quarter on the number of large deals over $ 100,000, and the company crossed 100,000 customers globally on the platform in the most recent quarter, so the approach seems to be working.

Let’s keep building

As with Salesforce a generation earlier, Box decided to build its product set on a platform of services. It enabled customers to tap into these base services like encryption, workflow and metadata and build their own customizations or even fully functional applications by taking advantage of the tools that Box has already built.

Much like Salesforce president and COO Bret Taylor told TechCrunch recently, that platform approach has been an integral part of its success, and Levie sees it similarly for Box. calling it fundamental to his company’s success, as well.

“We would not be here without that platform strategy,” he said. “Because we think about Box as a platform architecture, and we’ve built more and more capabilities into that platform, that’s what is giving us this strategic advantage right now,” he said.

And that hasn’t just worked to help customers using Box, it also helps Box itself to develop new capabilities more rapidly, something that has been absolutely essential during this pandemic when the company has had to react quickly to rapidly changing customer requirements.

Levie is 15 years into his tenure as CEO of Box, but he still sees a company and a market that is just getting started. “The opportunity is only bigger, and it’s more addressable by our product and platform today than it has been at any point in our history. So I think we’re still in the very early stages of digital transformation, and we’re in the earliest stages for how document and content management works in this modern era.”


Enterprise – TechCrunch


Top Tips To Get The Most From Microsoft’s New Shutterstock API

August 29, 2020 No Comments

Microsoft Advertising has given its users access to high-quality images with their new Shuttershock partnership. Here’s how you can make the most of it.

Read more at PPCHero.com
PPC Hero


©2018-2020 - American Online Phonebook - All Rights Reserved

Privacy Policy | Terms & Conditions