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Monthly Archives: June 2020

Fivetran snares $100M Series C on $1.2B valuation for data connectivity solution

June 30, 2020 No Comments

A big problem for companies these days is finding ways to connect to various data sources to their data repositories, and Fivetran is a startup with a solution to solve that very problem. No surprise then that even during a pandemic, the company announced today that it has raised $ 100 million Series C on a $ 1.2 billion valuation.

The company didn’t mess around with top flight firms Andreessen Horowitz and General Catalyst leading the investment with participation from existing investors CEAS Investments and Matrix Partners. Today’s money brings the total raised so far to $ 163 million, according to the company.

Martin Cassado from a16z described the company succinctly in a blog post he wrote after its $ 44 million Series B in September 2019, which his firm also participated in. “Fivetran is a SaaS service that connects to the critical data sources in an organization, pulls and processes all the data, and then dumps it into a warehouse (e.g., Snowflake, BigQuery or RedShift) for SQL access and further transformations, if needed. If data is the new oil, then Fivetran is the pipes that get it from the source to the refinery,” he wrote.

Writing in a blog post today announcing the new funding, CEO George Fraser added that in spite of current conditions, the company has continued to add customers. “Despite recent economic uncertainty, Fivetran has continued to grow rapidly as customers see the opportunity to reduce their total cost of ownership by adopting our product in place of highly customized, in-house ETL pipelines that require constant maintenance,” he wrote.

In fact, the company reports 75% customer growth over the prior 12 months. It now has over 1100 customers, which is a pretty good benchmark for a Series C company. Customers include Databricks, DocuSign, Forever 21, Square, Udacity and Urban Outfitters, crossing a variety of verticals.

Fivetran hopes to continue to build new data connectors as it expands the reach of its product and to push into new markets, even in the midst of today’s economic climate. With $ 100 million in the bank, it should have enough runway to ride this out, while expanding where it makes sense.


Enterprise – TechCrunch


Four strategies to maintain your social media activity during a crisis

June 30, 2020 No Comments

30-second summary:

  • It’s important to stay engaged with our audience during the crisis, and there’s a lot we can do to accomplish that.  
  • Low budgets, limited workforce, and lesser bandwidth for content production are some challenges businesses are seeing on the forefront.
  • Roman Daneghyan shares four strategies to maintain your social media activity during a crisis.

Social media is a fun place where we can engage with our audience on a daily basis. You’re probably already familiar with the benefits of social media, which means you maintain consistent social media activity. 

Unfortunately, during troubling times like the COVID-19 outbreak that we’re experiencing today, businesses often struggle to maintain an active social media presence. Your budget is low, the workforce is limited, and there’s usually little motivation to produce content with everything that’s going on around you. 

Still, it’s not that hard to maintain social media activity during a crisis, and it is perhaps the only sensible thing we can do. It’s important to stay engaged with our audience during the crisis, and there’s a lot we can do to accomplish that. 

Here are four strategies to maintain your social media activity during a crisis.

1. Repurposing content

If we are unable to create fresh content, we can always work with what we already have. If you had a well-built content strategy prior to the crisis, then chances are you have a lot of pieces to work with. Our goal here is to repurpose existing content into something fresh. 

Start with what you already have: a podcast, a video log, a long-form blog article, a sales letter, anything works. Try to collect all long-form, pillar content that you have. Next, we’re going to use and repurpose that content to create fresh content. A vlog turns into a blog, a blog into an email, an email into a tweet, and so on… you get the point.

Gary Vaynerchuk is a master of repurposing content, he also popularized the content pyramid model that is based on this idea. Gary says he can create 30 fresh pieces of content to be used across his channels just from a single daily episode of his show.  

Social media activity example repurposing content

Using a single piece of content, you can create fresh content for your social media accounts, and it doesn’t have to be a repost. You can repurpose a piece of content to tweet some bits on Twitter, start a discussion on Facebook, post an edited clip on Instagram, or share a concise blog post on LinkedIn. And boom, there’s your content.

Also, there’s no need to feel like a fraud for repurposing ‘used’ content. Most of your followers won’t remember your older posts, and they could always use a reminder, especially during a crisis. Even if we have nothing ‘new’ to say, we can still share our insights from the past. To give your old content a fresh look, you can add some eye-catching visuals to it. You can take the help of a web designing firm to create visuals that can get noticed in crowded social media feeds. 

2. Make use of content creation tools

With everything slowing down, it’s hard to create enough content all on your own. In the past few years, we saw a lot of content creation tools and templates come to life, and perhaps it’s time to make good use of them. Content creations tools help us to minimize the time, budget, and effort needed to create content, and now we need them more than ever.

Depending on your needs, there are various tools to choose from:

  • For research, you can make use of Google Drive’s Research Tool to conduct quick research, all it takes is clicking a simple ‘Explore’ button in the bottom right. Also, ‘Site: search’ function is another useful tool accessible from the browser.
  • If you need help writing posts for your social media account, you can use writing tools like Evernote to take notes, Grammarly to catch errors,  WriteRack to tweetstorm. 
  • If you want to post visual media then you have to try out tools like PicsArt. These tools are easy to use, and you can create great visual content in less than five minutes. Instead of spending hours on design, all you have to do is choose a template and fill it with your brand graphics.

It takes a lot of effort to create great social media content, but we can always make use of content creation tools to save some time or get a few creative ideas. 

3. Utilize user-generated content

User-generated content (UGC) is content created by people rather than brands, which means you don’t have to create anything. Utilizing UGC is incredibly important for social media, and it can be used to fill the gaps in your content strategy. Brands may not be able to create their own content during the crisis, but can always rely on user-generated content. 

The type of content you repost will vary depending on the media. 

Instagram: The king of user-generated content, Instagram has all kinds of options for brands to share content created by users. You can repost to your own profile, share images on your story, and easily browse using #hashtags and the Explore function. Aerie is a great example of how this should work:

Facebook: Facebook is a fantastic network for sharing stories and videos with your audience. You can invite your fans to contribute stories, images, or videos and use it to invite discussion and engage with the rest of your audience.

Twitter: A great place to utilize user-generated content, Twitter makes it easy with #hashtags and the “Retweet” function. You can simply retweet users and add your own comments to spark a discussion. Food brands do a great job on Twitter:

 

LinkedIn: Professionals love LinkedIn, and you can use LinkedIn to promote user content that’s relevant to your brand. You can repost the content or feature some users in your blog posts. 

If you want to search for location-specific content, you can always use a VPN service to gain access to content specific to a certain location. This method helps you to understand how your audience sees things, and you can tailor your content to meet their personal needs. 

4. Keep up with the updates

Posting relevant content is important, but don’t forget to post personal updates about your business. Your audience may want to know how you’re doing, whether there will be disruptions in service, and what to expect in the coming days. 

To add on to that, make sure you understand your position during a crisis. If you’re in the middle of it, you can provide daily updates on how your local community is dealing with the crisis, and that’s a good way to build a relationship with your audience. 

Lastly, don’t forget to show compassion for the victims, and you can even use one of the content tools to create supportive posts and remind your audience that you’re thinking of them. 

What’s your take?

What do you think about the ongoing crisis and what is your strategy to maintain your social media activity in the upcoming weeks?

The post Four strategies to maintain your social media activity during a crisis appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

Search Engine Watch


Google advanced search: Six powerful tips for better SEO

June 30, 2020 No Comments

30-second summary:

  • Google advanced search helps you get granular with your searches and deliver hyper-focused searches with the help of search operators (or a combination of them).
  • For example, you can search for articles published in the last week by your competitors or discover internal linking opportunities you might’ve missed.
  • In this how-to guide, Venngage’s Aditya Sheth outlines six Google advanced search hacks you need to know to master Google search and become a better SEO.

I have to come clean on something: I’m lazy.

While being lazy may not be a virtue, it does come with an unseen advantage: It allows you to look for creative ways to get things done without necessarily spending more time.

And as an SEO, I’m always looking for ways to get more done without working longer hours. Essentially: aiming to accomplish more with less.

One way to do more with less is to look for tools, tactics or even hacks that help you cut down time wasted and get more done, faster. 

One of my favorite hacks ever? Google advanced search.

But what is it? In simple terms, the Google advanced search helps you fine-tune your searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. 

This is an especially useful skill if you want to quickly pull up small-bits of information without always having to rely on tools like Ahrefs, Moz, or SEMRush to do it for you.

In this how-to SEO guide, you’ll use advanced search operators to:

Before we dive into the meat of this guide, first things first:

A mini-crash course on advanced search operators

To keep things simple, we’re going to cover four operators I, as an SEO, use most often.

The first operator is the site search operator. What this allows you to do is retrieve results from a single website. All you have to do is type site:[any website] into Google.

For example, If I enter site:semrush.com, I will only see results pertaining to SEMrush:

You don’t need the http://, https://, or www prefixes when using the site operator.

That’s not all, you can even use a keyword in addition to the site operator to find if that site has written any content around that keyword.

Let’s say I want to find whether we’ve covered the keyword “infographic” on the site. I’ll enter “site:semrush.com infographic” and this is what comes up:

I personally use the site operator very frequently as it limits my search results to a single domain. Keep this operator in mind as we’re going to be relying on it later.

The next operator you’ll find useful is the quotes or exact-match (“”) operator. What the exact-match operator does is limit your searches to exact-match phrases only.

For example, here is a normal Google search (notice the number of results):

And now the same phrase wrapped in quotation marks: 

 

Notice something different? 

Compared to a normal Google search, exact-match queries will only show you results where your keyphrase has been mentioned exactly as it is (and not a variation). 

This operator is especially powerful to identify if your site has any duplicate content that could be sabotaging your rankings (more on this later).

Last but not the least, we’re going to learn the dash (-) and plus (+) operators to perform laser-targeted searches. 

What the dash (-) operator does is excludes certain keywords from appearing in the search results. So if I wanted to read about the topic of search engines but not search engine optimization, I’d use the following query: 

 

By using the “- optimization” in my search, I’ll only see results about search engines and not search engine optimization.

The plus (+) operator, you guessed it — does the exact opposite. You can use the plus operator to add words to your original search and show you a different set of results. 

For example, here’s a query I entered in Google search:

What did I do here? I used the site:, dash and plus operators in conjunction to show me articles that closely relate to search engine marketing but not SEO on the Search Engine Watch blog.

Venngage

There are many search operators out there (too many to list in fact). You can find a much more comprehensive list of search operators on the Moz blog.

But for simplicity’s sake, we’re going to stick to the site, exact match, dash, and plus operators in this guide.

Six Google advanced search tips for better SEO

Using the Google advanced search operators above, you can access exactly what you’re looking for and spend less time searching for it.

Advanced search can come really handy especially when you’re just starting out and don’t have the budget for expensive SEO tools.

Imagine all the endless possibilities that lie in wait for you as an SEO; if only you got better at googling. Well, it’s easier than you think. I’ll show it to you:

1. Conduct basic but insightful competitor research

Conducting competitor research on Google is really easy. All you have to do is use the “related:” search operator followed by a website URL. 

“Related:” allows you to find sites that are closely related to a specific URL. You can use related to identify not only direct competitors but also indirect peripheral competitors that you might’ve missed in your competitor research.

Not only that, the related: operator also helps you understand how Google is categorizing your competitors and your website.

Let’s look at what Google returns if we search for competitors related to Venngage

I already know the first three results are our direct competitors, but the last two are surprising because they seem to be indirectly competing with us (and I wasn’t even aware of them).

We’re an online infographic maker tool while both Column Five Media and InfoNewt appear to be done-for-you agencies. Google has identified and categorized them as sites related to Venngage which is an insightful find.

Don’t dismiss this advanced search hack because of its simplicity. Try it for yourself and see what Google comes up with. You might just come away with a better understanding of the competition as it pertains to SEO.

2. Stalk your competitor’s content strategy

Sticking to the topic of competitor research, here’s a cool way you can spy on your competitor’s content strategy: combining the site operator and Google’s date-range filter.

Let’s try this on one of our direct competitors: Piktochart.

To limit my search to only blog-related results, I’ll use Piktochart’s/blog subdomain instead of their website. And by the looks of it, they have 790 pages on their blog. 

I can use the date-range filter (click on tools and filter by date) to further drill down these results to identify what content they published in the last month only. Here’s what comes up: 

This not only tells me Pitkchart published four new articles last month but also gives me insight into Piktocharts’ content strategy and the keywords they’re targeting.

You can find even more data by filtering the results by days, months, or custom time periods. 

I can even include exact-match (“your keyword” in quotes) keywords to find out how much content Piktochart has published on any given topic, which is a clever way to uncover their topic cluster strategy. 

Let’s take content marketing as a topic for example

Using the site operator in conjunction with the date filters on Google search gives you information on: 

  • How much content your competition has published till date
  • How often they publish new content in a given time period
  • What kind of content they publish at a certain point in time
  • How often your competitor has written about a given topic

Pretty cool right? 

3. Unearth a gold mine of guest posting opportunities 

If your goal is to drive quality traffic back to your website, pick up high-quality backlinks, boost your website’s domain authority and even rank higher on Google — guest blogging will help you do all of the above.

Anybody that tells you guest blogging is dead is either lying or in on it. Guest blogging still works, even in 2020.

Now that we’ve briefly covered how important guest blogging really is, how do you uncover guest blogging opportunities in your niche or industry?

Here are a few advanced search queries you can copy and paste into Google

  • Your Keyword “guest post opportunities”
  • Your Keyword “guest post”
  • Your Keyword “submit guest post”
  • Your Keyword “submit blog post”
  • Your Keyword intitle:“write for us”
  • Your Keyword intitle:“guest post guidelines”

If I’m looking to guest post for sites in the design space, for example, I’d use the following query:

Sites bookmarked. Guest post pitches sent. Fingers crossed. 

Try out these search queries for yourself and you’ll be able to build a respectable list of sites to contribute for.

Brian Dean has the most exhaustive guide on guest blogging I’ve read (it includes a huge list of search operators that will help you find even more guest posting opportunities).

4. Discover hidden opportunities for internal linking

Internal linking plays a small but important role in the ranking factors that determine how well you rank on Google.

Irrespective of how well-designed and easy-to-navigate your site may be, a great internal linking structure can make all the difference when it comes to driving traffic from one post to another across your entire blog.

Internal linking also creates topical relevance by creating supporting content for the main topics of your website.

A few weeks ago, I published a mammoth webinar guide on the Venngage blog. I wanted it to start driving traffic to the post and rank for high-volume keywords immediately.

I got to work by finding out where I could link to our guide internally from as many relevant posts on our blog as possible. All I did was use the site operator and the keyword “webinar”: 

Boom! Barring the first result, I found 47 internal linking opportunities with a simple search. And all it took was a few seconds.

You can even use this search query: site:www.yourwebsite.com/blog intext:”your keyword” to pretty much do the same thing.

This advanced search hack won’t be as useful if you’ve recently started blogging, but it will come in handy if you manage a huge blog that already has a lot of existing content.

5. Find duplicate content on your website

Duplicate content is content that appears on more than one location on your website and can confuse search engines when it comes to deciding which page to rank higher. 

In short: Duplicate content can hurt your website rankings and it’s a technical SEO issue you cannot afford to ignore.

To show you an example of duplicate content, I’ll use this small piece of copy from the Apple Airpods product description on Walmart

Google advanced search tips: Duplicate Content

Using the site operator, I’ll paste the copy into Google using the exact-match operator. Here’s what I come up with: 

The same piece of copy shows up on six other pages on Walmart. Things could be a lot worse but still, not ideal.

But if I were to search for the same piece of copy across the web (not just Walmart) using the dash operator, this is what comes up:

The same piece of copy appears on ~19,000 other websites (excluding Walmart). That’s a lot of duplicate content. 

Duplicate content is especially a major issue for website blogs with 1,000s of pages or ecommerce sites with the same product descriptions. 

6. Find missed content opportunities

One of the last search operators I’ll cover is the “filetype” operator. 

Filetype can help you find non-HTML content on your site, such as Word Documents or PDF files. This content is often valuable, but not search optimized. And traffic to it doesn’t show up in your Analytics.

To use this search operator, simple type in “site:yourwebsite.com filetype:pdf” like so: 

Then look at that content. Have you published it as HTML content? Is it search optimized? Is there an opportunity to make it a valuable, rank-worthy and trackable webpage?

PDF files are often the rust of the internet, added to sites because the content manager doesn’t have an easy way to publish actual web pages.

They should always be an alternate (print-friendly, download-friendly) version of HTML content. They should almost never be the only version of a piece of content.  

Your turn to master Google search

Congratulations! You’ve officially made it to the end of this mammoth guide. 

Google is far more powerful and robust than we realize or give it credit for. 

Knowing what to search for and how to search for it with the help of Google advanced search operators will help you harness Google’s true power and in turn, grow your site.

As SEOs, our job comprises running SEO tests, tinkering with Google’s algorithms, and staying on top of the latest search trends.

Google advanced search is not only a fun skill that you can learn over the weekend. It can help you uncover opportunities hiding in plain sight and help you be more effective at your job.

The real kicker

Google is and always will be free. The know-how to fine-tune your searches will help you become a better SEO and pay dividends over the long term.

Has using Google advanced search in your day-to-day made you a better SEO? Which search operators do you use most frequently? Did I miss any advanced search tips? Drop them in the comments below.

Aditya Sheth does Content & SEO at Venngage. You can connect with him on Linkedin or find him on Twitter @iamadityashth.

The post Google advanced search: Six powerful tips for better SEO appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

Search Engine Watch


Tune-up your pitch tomorrow at Pitchers & Pitches

June 30, 2020 No Comments

Ready to breathe some life into your 60-second pitch? Turn your internet dial to our next Pitchers & Pitches webinar tomorrow, July 1 at 4 p.m. ET / 1 p.m. PT. It’s free for everyone, and all you need to do is register right here.

Tune in as five early-stage startup founders (all of whom you’ll find exhibiting in Digital Startup Alley during Disrupt 2020) step to the mound to bring the heat. Translation: They’ll deliver their best 60-second elevator pitch to a panel of judges — and benefit from real-time critique, feedback and advice from industry experts who know how to craft a winning pitch.

Judging this session we have pitch-savvy TechCrunch editors, Jordan Crook and Kirsten Korosec, plus two VCs — Matthew Hartman of Betaworks Ventures and Dayna Grayson of Construct Capital. Yes, essential feedback from startup investors — the very people founders need to impress most.

Not only will the five pitching founders come away with a stronger presentation, one of them will walk away with a pretty cool prize. The viewing audience (that would be you) decides who wins a consulting session with cela, a company that connects early-stage startups to accelerators and incubators that can help scale their businesses.

Note: Only companies that purchase a Disrupt Digital Startup Alley Package are eligible to pitch. You’ll still learn valuable tips and strategies — even if you’re not facing the judges. Watch, listen, and apply the expert tips and strategies to power up your pitch — your handshake to the startup world. This is your chance to make it firm and impressive.

Here are the startups we randomly selected to compete tomorrow:

Cognidna – provides DNA insights on cognitive traits, helping parents make more informed educational decisions for their children.

Munch – a digital platform for restaurants designed to create better customer experiences.

Flexlane – an online wholesale marketplace that transforms the way local retailers in Asia buy for their stores.

Bitsensing – aims to design future safety in the era of Autonomous Vehicles.

Evertracker – a neutral platform that provides end-to-end visibility and predictability along global supply chains on an item-level.

Don’t miss this masterclass. Register for Pitches & Pitchers and tune in tomorrow, July 1 at 4 p.m. ET / 1 p.m. PT. If you want a shot at pitching during the Pitchers & Pitches session scheduled on July 22, be sure to buy your Disrupt Digital Startup Alley Package first to be eligible.

Is your company interested in sponsoring or exhibiting at Disrupt 2020? Contact our sponsorship sales team by filling out this form.


Startups – TechCrunch


Competitor Strategies for Lead Generation – A Case Study

June 30, 2020 No Comments

A case study on how one paid media marketer set up successful competitor campaigns to help a brand drive more high-value leads.

Read more at PPCHero.com
PPC Hero


CIO Cynthia Stoddard explains Adobe’s journey from boxes to the cloud

June 29, 2020 No Comments

Up until 2013, Adobe sold its software in cardboard boxes that were distributed mostly by third party vendors.

In time, the company realized there were a number of problems with that approach. For starters, it took months or years to update, and Adobe software was so costly, much of its user base didn’t upgrade. But perhaps even more important than the revenue/development gap was the fact that Adobe had no direct connection to the people who purchased its products.

By abdicating sales to others, Adobe’s customers were third-party resellers, but changing the distribution system also meant transforming the way the company developed and sold their most lucrative products.

The shift was a bold move that has paid off handsomely as the company surpassed an $ 11 billion annual run rate in December — but it still was an enormous risk at the time. We spoke to Adobe CIO Cynthia Stoddard to learn more about what it took to completely transform the way they did business.

Understanding the customer

Before Adobe could make the switch to selling software as a cloud service subscription, it needed a mechanism for doing that, and that involved completely repurposing their web site, Adobe.com, which at the time was a purely informational site.

“So when you think about transformation the first transformation was how do we connect and sell and how do we transition from this large network of third parties into selling direct to consumer with a commerce site that needed to be up 24×7,” Stoddard explained.

She didn’t stop there though because they weren’t just abandoning the entire distribution network that was in place. In the new cloud model, they still have a healthy network of partners and they had to set up the new system to accommodate them alongside individual and business customers.

She says one of the keys to managing a set of changes this immense was that they didn’t try to do everything at once. “One of the things we didn’t do was say, ‘We’re going to move to the cloud, let’s throw everything away.’ What we actually did is say we’re going to move to the cloud, so let’s iterate and figure out what’s working and not working. Then we could change how we interact with customers, and then we could change the reporting, back office systems and everything else in a very agile manner,” she said.


Enterprise – TechCrunch


Newzoo forecasts 2020 global games industry will reach $159 billion

June 29, 2020 No Comments

Games and esports analytics firm Newzoo released its highly cited annual report on the size and state of the video gaming industry yesterday. The firm is predicting 2020 global game industry revenue from consumers of $ 159.3 billion, a 9.3% increase year-over-year. Newzoo predicts the market will surpass $ 200 billion by the end of 2023.

Importantly, the data excludes in-game advertising revenue (which surged +59% during COVID-19 lockdowns, according to Unity) and the market of gaming digital assets traded between consumers. Advertising within games is a meaningful source of revenue for many mobile gaming companies. In-game ads in just the U.S. drove roughly $ 3 billion in industry revenue last year, according to eMarketer.

To compare with gaming, the global markets for other media and entertainment formats are:

Counting gamers

Of 7.8 billion people on the planet, 4.2 billion (53.6%) of whom have internet connectivity, 2.69 billion will play video games this year, and Newzoo predicts that number to reach three billion in 2023. It broke down the current geographic distribution of gamers as:

  • 1,447 million (54%) in Asia-Pacific
  • 386 million (14%) in Europe
  • 377 million (14%) in Middle East & Africa
  • 266 million (10%) in Latin America
  • 210 million (8%) in North America


    Social – TechCrunch


An Ohio City’s Campaign Got More People to Buy Electric Cars

June 29, 2020 No Comments

In just three years, Columbus managed to exceed its goal of more than 3,200 new BEVs and plug-in hybrids.
Feed: All Latest


Why Honesty is the Best Policy in PPC Marketing

June 28, 2020 No Comments

Over the years, I have seen so many horror stories when it comes to PPC Management. Whether it’s advertisers flying blind with their ad budgets or the common event of not knowing that their ads are being shown with irrelevant terms, there should always 100% transparency between the agency and the client. Furthermore, there needs to be more HONESTY on behalf of the PPC Agency. In this post, I will talk about a few areas of the Agency/Client Relationship that should be based on being honest with the client.

Educate the Advertiser:

Let’s face it, the PPC agency knows more about PPC Marketing than the client. However, that does not mean the client needs to be taken advantage of because they do not know how everything works. The person handling the client’s account needs to “in many ways” educate the client as to what is working, not working and where there are opportunities.

Admit Mistakes:

Everyone makes mistakes, right? Well, PPC Agencies should not try and hide them just because they can get away with it. Agencies should be forthcoming with admitting mistakes that were made and how efficiently and effectively they were fixed. It’s better to be honest with the client, than having them find out later that you lied to them. Ever heard of a Referral or a Testimonial?

Honest and Factual Reporting:

Over the years, I have seen so many poor examples of PPC Reporting where clients receive an excel spreadsheet of just Clicks, Impressions, CTR%, CPCs, etc… and not a single keyword or text ad or even a sentence on the performance of the account. In today’s world that is unacceptable.  Moreover, I have also seen examples of trend charts being manipulated to disguise the true performance of a specific metric. Agencies have a responsibility to provide not only excellent service, but also honest and factual reporting.

Managing Expectations:

PPC Marketing is not for everyone and for those who are spending money have this perception that the more they spend the better the results. That is completely FALSE. If an client/advertiser was given any sort of Guarantee from an agency, they should “run for the hills”. Guarantees in PPC Marketing are very dangerous for both parties because they create false expectations. An agency must be honest and upfront with the client when it comes to setting expectations both on performance and future success. The agency must have a clear understanding of the client’s:

  • Cost per Conversions/Acquisition
  • Targeted Audience
  • Messaging Tactics
  • Daily and Monthly Budgets

In Conclusion:

Honesty is always the best policy in PPC. Agencies have a responsibility to not only provide excellent service, but also be honest and forthcoming with the client. I have heard countless stories of poor PPC Management, including the topics I mentioned in this post. Some may say that is good for the industry because it creates more “turnover” and more opportunities for other agencies. However, for this PPC Geek, I believe in Happy Clients.


Digital Marketing Agency | Google Ads Consultant


Studying the anatomy of a successful high-conversion landing page

June 27, 2020 No Comments

30-second summary:

  • Landing pages can help you appeal to your audience, so they want to stick around and make the switch to a paying customer.
  • The structure of your landing page is just as important as its content and should lead the human eye directly to the CTA.
  • The top 25% of landing pages convert at 5.3% or higher relative to the average conversion rate of 2.35%- it pays to optimize your landing page.
  • The anatomy of a landing page is key to increasing conversions; by strengthening first impressions, embedding psychological trust, capturing email leads, demonstrating UPS, and illustrating social proof.

A high proportion of landing pages convert well as they are created following key fundamental steps. This is largely down to the structure of a landing page as it aligns with persuasion, including elements that help to persuade. 

A landing page with a high conversion rate is the solid foundation of a successful online business. The average landing page conversion rate across industries is 2.35%, with the top 25% converting at 5.31% or higher. As a business, no matter the conversion goal or the intended audience, following a set of structural rules can elevate your business. 

Landing page search conversion rate stats

Source: WordStream

For this specific reason, it is essential to understand the anatomy of a landing page to help boost your business, prompting better results. In most cases, all landing pages look poles apart but read in between the lines the same. Below, we will discuss the structure of landing pages in more detail.

Landing pages – understanding them

In marketing, a lot of time and effort is spent on driving traffic to a website. The intention is to reach the target audience with a hope that they will interact with the site and join the opt-in action, which might be in the form of subscribing to a newsletter or signing-up. 

However, this does not always entice an audience into the sales funnel, converting them into customers. For this reason, landing pages are crucial and are at large, consist of effective content, graphics and call-to-actions (CTAs).

What is a landing page?

In all cases, a landing page is a web page that all site visitors are sent to initiate a conversation attempting to close a deal. Some of the most effective landing pages are stand-alone pages that are created for a single purpose where the CTA is pointed directly at the targeted audience. To get a higher conversion rate on email marketing, your landing page ought to give your visitors positive user experience. 

To be frank, landing pages live separately from your initial website. They are designed only to receive campaign traffic. Separating them from websites allows organizations to focus on a single objective, making analytics easier, and testing simpler, which we will look at in more detail below. A landing page can be used for almost anything. However, the purpose of the page needs to be clear with a definitive link to an appropriate call-to-action. 

Landing page Nike example

Source: Nike

For example, taking a look at the landing page above created by Nike, it is immediately evident from the onset precisely what product they are promoting, with a small purpose text and a call to action. The use of different colors also plays a vital role which will explore later.

Why you need a landing page

Landing pages are used to achieve particular goals. These can be either to build an email list, grow a brand, or to make a profit. 

Landing page stats

Source: Hallam

Landing pages also offer essential metrics for measuring the success rate of your business’s marketing campaign. By looking at the graph above, it is evident that by analyzing a single landing page, organizations can see the history of important metrics such as bounce rates. 

At the core of a landing page sits an opt-in process for page visitors. The landing page metrics give organizations the clear insight they need to grow their business in the right direction successfully.

Here’s a look at numerous benefits that businesses can gain by producing specific landing pages. 

Promote a positive first impression 

If you consider that there are far more interesting pages to look at online in comparison to your landing page, you will begin to understand that the duration of time visitors spend on your site will be relatively low. For this reason, first impressions count. Landing pages aid businesses to appeal to their audience, transitioning them from a reader into a solid customer.  

Use trust elements to your advantage

Images, graphics, and videos can attract visitors and have a way of persuading them emotionally to take action. Many psychology studies have indicated that people respond better to visual information than to text, resulting in much more positive user experience. Doing so can produce spectacular results, potentially giving business over a million unique visitors from Google alone. 

Landing page content example

Source: ColumnFive

The image above indicates processing visual content can be done at rapid speeds with greater retention and appeal, making clear that understanding visual content takes a small fraction of your reader’s attention span. 

Increase conversion rate

Landing pages allow you to increase your conversion rate as it is easier to capture email leads from them in comparison to a typical blog. This is because a landing page has only one purpose. A website or a blog focuses on highlighting trending posts, recommending affiliate products or services, whereas the landing page is solely focused on the CTA. 

Now we’ve spent a little time looking at what landing pages are, let’s now dissect the anatomy of one, focusing on the key components of a successful high-conversion landing page.

The components of a successful high-conversion landing page

What is your unique selling proposition as a business?

No matter what industry or field your business participates in, a fierce competition is always inevitable. As a business, your unique selling proposition is what sets you and your competitor’s miles apart. Your USP on your landing page is how you decide to position your offering differently. 

Landing pages need to communicate this proposition in a succinct way sufficiently. Why? So your visitors can immediately understand what makes your product or service far more appealing compared to others alike. To do so, you must follow and include page elements that aid in telling your story clearly.

Landing page iPhone SE example

Source: Apple

The main headline: One of the first things visitors will see and read is the headline. For this reason, it needs to be precise. Keeping the headline punchy and to the point is a must, being direct about your USP is vital. As demonstrated by Apple’s landing page above, they have decided to make the headline their product name, making clear what the landing page is promoting.

Supporting headline: As our heading needs to be short and sweet, additional context can be offered in the form of a subheading, adding a touch more information. The shorter the subheading, the better, as exemplified on Apple’s landing page. A subheading can have two approaches. The first being a direct extension of the headline itself. The second is offering additional information, conveying a secondary message that is persuasive. Apple has chosen the latter, by using the word “love” it adds an emotional element of persuasion. 

Reinforcing statement: This is optional and depends on the length of your landing page. If the landing page runs long, you will want to add a reinforcing statement towards the middle of the page to help remind visitors of your USP. However, the reinforcing statement can also be used to persuade, as Apple has done so, by including prices and offering a “trade-in” option.

Closing statement: a closing statement is typically used to back up your USP, giving your visitor one last chance to convert into a customer. It is thought to be the climax to your offering, so making it count will pay off. A strong closing statement will help remind the visitor why they are on your landing page along with a repeat CTA with a little urgency.

The hero image or video

As mentioned above, first impressions are paramount, and so, the hero image is the first visual your visitor will see on your landing page. Hero images are thought to be the primary image that helps to convey your message. The image should clearly demonstrate and convey and communicate the use of your product or service as demonstrated by the below image from Mercedes-Benz. 

Landing page Mercedes example

Source: Mercedes

With that in mind, some businesses prefer to use text-only landing pages that do not include videos or images. The purpose of this strategy is, since page loading times affect Google rankings, text-based landing pages load with speed, increasing the user experience. However, as we explored above, the retention and processing of text is much slower,

Video landing pages have become increasingly popular over the years thanks to sites like YouTube and Vimeo. Research has shown that one-third of all online activity comes from users watching videos. Videos are also increasingly interactive and help to demonstrate how your product or service works transparently.

Source: Statista

The graph above provided by Statista indicates the share of businesses that were using videos on their landing page worldwide between the years 2016-2018. As you can see there was an 11% increase between 2016 and 2017 which is considered to be quite high and a 3% decrease in 2018, which is relatively low. Considering economic issues, it seems videos that are present on landing pages are proving to be successful for businesses.

The benefits of your offering

One of the main components of your landing page is the copy that is placed on it which helps to persuade readers. The key to your copy is to describe the specific benefits of your product or service along with flaunting its features. The feature helps to demonstrate a particular quality of your product and the benefit describes its positive impact. To drive and increase conversions, it is better to show off features and benefits together as Apple have done so with their “Lots of love, Less to spend’ copy. In this case, the feature of the product is what it can do for the customer, and the benefit is the price.

A form of social proof

Landing pages that convert well have examples of social proof that can be used to help influence your reader’s decision making. Pictures of customers, social media posts, and testimonials of users using your product help to build trust and help gain conversions. Large organizations such as Apple mix between using this strategy. The image below clearly indicates the benefits of social proof.

Source:Unbounce

Conversion goal – CTA

The landing page’s key focus is a conversion goal, getting visitors to follow the CTA which can be a stand-alone button, a click-through page or a form designed for lead generation. When creating your CTAs, it would be wise not to use a bland button with text that says ‘click here’. Using conversation language as Apple has done so will let visitors know exactly what to expect when clicking on it if you opt to use a form, keep it short while including a privacy statement reassuring visitors that their data is safe. 

Considering the psychology of color, Apple has used it to their advantage. Using the right colors help improve landing page conversions. The color blue is thought to make readers feel peaceful, which is the color Apple has chosen for their CTA text. The text also stands out from the other colors used on the pallet of the page. 

Increasing your landing page conversion rate

Market research

Conducting market research is essential for your landing page. Gathering vital information surrounding your target audience and customers will assist you in creating a valuable and desirable customer experience. Doing so will help you gain an insight into the topics of interest surrounding your target market, allowing you to create a streamlined, well-targeted landing page.

A/B testing

Testing landing pages is vital. A/B testing is the process of running a simultaneous experiment between two or more pages in the aim to see which pages perform the best. Doing so can help gather evidence considering variations between texts, heading, and images. 

Gathering metrics from analytics and A/B testing platforms like Finteza and Optimizely can help you make clear and concise decisions based on first-hand data collected when considering the behavior of your audience.

By seeing the effectiveness of a specific landing page, you’ll be able to make more informed decisions when it comes to allocating marketing budget and spending time.

Source: Finteza

The impact of testing can largely elevate your business as President Obama raised an additional $ 60million dollars by using A/B testing in his last campaign.

The post Studying the anatomy of a successful high-conversion landing page appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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